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COACH WYATT'S DOUBLE WING SYSTEM

North Beach Formations

MY OFFENSIVE SYSTEM IS GENERICALLY CALLED THE DOUBLE-WING

DW

(TECHNICALLY SPEAKING -  IF EITHER END  IS SPLIT, THE FORMATION IS NOT A "DOUBLE WING.")
WING

IN STRICT FOOTBALL TERMINOLOGY, A WING (SHOWN AT LEFT) IS A FORMATION CONSISTING OF

A TIGHT END (1)  AND

A WINGBACK (2) -  (A WINGBACK DEFINED AS A BACK CLOSE TO THE LINE AND JUST OUTSIDE THE TIGHT END)

MY SYSTEM CAN BE - AND FREQUENTLY IS - RUN FROM A WIDE VARIETY OF SETS, SOME OF THEM SHOWN IN THE PHOTOS ABOVE: THE BASE FORMATION ("TIGHT" FORMATION AT LEFT IN THE PHOTO ABOVE) CONSISTS OF TWO TIGHT ENDS AND TWO WINGBACKS"SLOT" FORMATION, SECOND FROM LEFT, SHOWS  HOW EASILY WE CAN ADD ANOTHER FORMATION, YET PRESENT DEFENSES WITH VASTLY DIFFERENT PROBLEMS; THIRD FROM LEFT IS AN UNBALANCED-LINE FORMATION, FROM WHICH WE CAN RUN MOST OF OUR OFFENSIVE PACKAGE; AND FARTHEST RIGHT IS "STACK" FORMATION, WHICH ALSO ALLOWS US TO RUN MOST OF OUR OFFENSE

THE ROOTS OF THE SYSTEM

My roots in this system go back to 1979, running the Run and Shoot (Double Slot) as an assistant to Steve Stanich at Central Catholic High School in Portland, Oregon. Lots of people in the Northwest were running it then, largely because of the influence of Darrell "Mouse" Davis, who had won a state championship at Hillsboro, Oregon, High and then had moved on to Portland State, where he was putting up huge scores.  Mouse Davis, a brilliant offensive innovator, was the guy who eventually introduced the Run and Shoot to pro football.

Many people are under the mistaken impression that Mouse Davis invented the Run and Shoot. Actually, Mouse (who preferred to call his offense the "Double Slot")  always gave credit for its invention to the late Glenn "Tiger" Ellison, of Middletown, Ohio, whose book, "Run and Shoot Football," is still available (fair warning: be prepared to PAY for it). Most people who have read Tiger Ellison's book will recognize immediately Mouse Davis' role in modifying and popularizing Tiger Ellison's invention and adapting it to the pro game.

R&S

DOUBLE SLOT (RUN AND SHOOT)

In 1980, I took the head coaching job at Hudson's Bay High, a large high school in Vancouver, Washington, and continued with the Run and Shoot that my predecessor at "Bay" had been running so successfully. But when it became apparent by my third year there that we were having as much success "Running" as "Shooting," especially with the misdirection running game,  I decided to get serious and try to learn more about misdirection from the best in the business - the University of Delaware. I contacted them and bought a playbook and a two-reel film package showing the Delaware Wing-T in action, and it turned out to be the best purchase I ever made.

WING-T

DELAWARE WING-T

I started out trying to run Delaware's plays from the double slot (Run and Shoot) formation, but soon realized the stupidity of trying to reinvent something that had already proven successful, and changed over to the Delaware attack 100 per cent.  Rather than adopt the Delaware numbering system, though, I retained my play-calling numbering and terminology, which I found was a lot easier for me to teach to high school kids. I especially liked it because it guaranteed that our backs wouldn't crash into each other (this is no joke - that can be a major problem in teaching any misdirection offense). My decision to retain my terminology would turn out to be the key to the development of my current system.

That was 1983. Over the years, I came to love and respect the Delaware Wing-T (still do). We rarely had a player over 210 pounds, and one year our backfield averaged only 5-7 and 150 pounds, but our Wing-T kept us competitive in the state's largest classification.

Like Delaware, we ran from multiple sets - often shifting in and out of them - and we used lots of motion. Although we played with one end or the other split most of the time, our base set - which we just called "Tight" - was a Double Wing, exactly,  except for the wider  splits,   like the one I run today. We could - and sometimes did - run our entire package from it.

In 1987, I went overseas, and spent two seasons running my Wing-T with a Finnish team. Overall, I coached in Finland for seven seasons, and in the process won two National Championships; but those first two years, playing in the top division with an inexperienced small-town team, were tough going. We moved the ball okay, but we stunk on defense. And the worst beatings we ever got, both years,  were at the hands of a team from Helsinki, the big city - a team called the Roosters.

Compared to us small-town guys, the Roosters were big-time. They were big and talented and experienced, and they could afford two American coaches - one for offense and one for defense. Their offensive coach was a California named Don Markham, and he ran a power play nobody could stop.

He ran it from a Double Wing.  It looked almost the same as my Double-Wing - my "Tight" formation - but upon closer inspection, his "Tight" was really tight.  There were very tight splits (if any at all), and his fullback was much closer to the line of scrimmage than mine. I could immediately see how easy it would be to adapt Don Markham's power play - and the trap that complemented it - to my system, but to do it was going to mean tightening up my "Tight" formation, at least when I wanted to run those plays.

It didn't make a whole lot of sense to me to jump into that formation just to run those two plays, and yet I didn't want to give up the versatility and flexibility of my Delaware Wing-T system, so for me the big question became, "How much of my offense can I still run if I go to this tighter formation?"

The answer, I found, was, "all of it" - and then some. And, true to its Wing-T roots, we are able to run our core plays from a variety of formations, several of which you'll see in the photos above.

I have never departed from Wing-T thinking, and for the most part, my blocking principles and rules are those that have enabled the Delaware Wing-T to remain an effective offense years after other offenses have come and gone.

Rather than go on, I urge readers to read the article with which I introduced my first video, "Dynamics of the Double Wing." 

AN OFFENSE WORTH LOOKING AT - Reprinted from Texas Coach  Magazine, March 1996

Read my article on the "WILDCAT" direct-snap package from SCHOLASTIC COACH

RETURN TO HOME

A graduate of Yale, Hugh Wyatt has been coaching football since 1970. After two years in the World Football League, as Player Personnel Director in Philadelphia and Assistant General Manager in Portland, he has been a high school coach in the Pacific Northwest. since 1976. He has coached internationally, in Finland and Denmark, and early in 1996 released an instructional videotape, "Dynamics of the Double Wing." Since 1976, he has been a head coach at seven high schools in the Pacific Northwest, and an assistant coach at six.  Overseas, he  has also been a head coach of three different teams in Finland.

Since 1997, Coach Wyatt has put on more than 185 clinics or camps in 28 states and a Canadian province ... Alabama, Alaska, Alberta (Canada), California, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin... He has personally coached the Double-Wing in Finland, Denmark and Germany, and at 5 different US high schools.

In 2008, in one year at North Beach High School in Ocean Shores, Washington his team went 7-3 and earned him Pacific League Coach of the Year honors. (In 2007, North Beach had finished 1-9.)

In 2009 he served as offensive coordinator at Woodburn, Oregon, a Class 5A school that had won just two games in the last five years. With heavy emphasis on his Wildcat, Woodburn's 2009 team under head coach Tracy Jackson won three games, including the school's first league win in twelve years!

In 2011, after a two year hiatus during which North Beach went 3-16,  he returned to North Beach as an assistant to new head coach Todd Bridge. In the first year of Coach Bridge's rebuild, North Beach,  starting three freshmen on the offensive line,  managed three wins, including a defeat of the defending state champions,  and North Beach's first home win since 2008)

In 2012, North Beach won four games, and in 2013, adding an "open wing" to the Double Wing attack,  North Beach improved to 7-3.

In 2014, North Beach finished 10-1,  finally losing in the state quarterfinals after winning ten straight.   Combining Coach Wyatt's "Open Wing" with his Double Wing,  the North Beach Hyaks  outscored their opponents 437-74 and experienced their first undefeated regular season ever,  their first outright league championship since 1975, and their first playoff win since 1983.  Todd Bridge was voted Pacific League Coach of the Year and,  following North Beach's double-overtime win over league power Raymond,  Seattle Seahawks' State Coach of the Week.  North Beach  finished Number 4 in the final Washington State Class 2B rankings.

Copyright 2012 Coach Hugh Wyatt. All rights reserved. Do not redistribute or publish in any form without permission from Coach Hugh Wyatt. All material - content, graphics, logos and backgrounds - is the sole property of Coach Hugh Wyatt and may not be redistributed or published in any form without specific permission to do so.